Sunday, February 18, 2018

DACA Recipient Praises Trump, Blasts Democrats for Using Him as a ‘Pawn’

By Onan Coca
February 13, 2018

Could this be a sign that things are beginning to change out their in the immigrant community at-large?

Probably not, but one could hope that more immigrants are also beginning to see the wisdom in Hilario Yanez’s words.
Yanez is a DACA program recipient, or a DREAMer, who has come to realize two things – President Trump has done a “great” job, and the Democrats are using DREAMers as political “pawns.” Yanez, and again, hopefully other DREAMers, have noticed that the President seems very willing to give the Democrats everything they want when it comes to DACA… and it’s the Democrats who seem unwilling to deal with President Trump.

He sees Democrat leadership playing games with the DACA debate in an effort to make the Republicans look bad and to help their own election chances. Meanwhile, President Trump and the GOP have offered not just amnesty to the DACA recipients but to all of the DACA eligible people in the USA. This concession is actually MORE than Democrats have asked for, and yet Democrats continue to drag their feet… why? Yanez thinks he understands why – the Democrats are just using him and his fellow DREAMers as pawns in their political games.
In a recent interview on Fox News, Yanez explained:

Three points I want to make about that. Number one is the Democratic leadership, Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer really have no clear message, have been, you know, we have been confused. I think at the end of the day they have been using us as pawns.
The second point I want to bring in is they should have never shut down the government over DACA. We should have never held our American people and our military hostage. There is plenty of time on the table to fix this. March 5th is the deadline. And you can see Republicans already willing to do something about it as we speak.

And the last thing, point that I want to say is that look, Democrats, they owned all three branches of the government back in 2008 to 2011 and they still choose not to do anything. So at this point I am quite frustrated with the Democratic leadership.
While he sees the ugly partisanship the Democrats are displaying, Yanez also hopes that they’ll eventually come to the negotiating table and get a deal done.

I think at the end of the day you are looking at a president that’s all about results and it’s all about — at the end of the day, I think he needs to meet Democrats in the middle. And he is bringing this pathway to citizenship so that we can actually finally get something done immigration reform. At the end of the day in terms of legislation, you’re probably looking at one of the greatest presidents to get things done. I mean, look at the tax cuts. He got that done. Now he’s trying to do immigration reform. Now the next thing is infrastructure. So this guy, President Trump, is willing to work with Democrats but at the end the day it is the Democrats who don’t want to work with him.
During the interview Yanez also explains that he loves this country and he only wants the chance to serve it. “At the end of the day, when I hear the national anthem I get goosebumps all over me. I always pledged allegiance to the flag and I would never disrespect it. I would never take a knee and I would do anything to serve this country, to die for this country, and all I need is a chance,” he told Fox & Friends. It’s DREAMers like Yanez that are the reason President Trump is ready to extend amnesty, the question is… will the Democrats let him?

 

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Where Did The Hatred For The U.S. Flag Start


EVER WONDER WHERE COLIN KAEPERNICK GOT HIS IDEA
TO KNEEL AND DISRESPECT THE FLAG?

 
Code, Title 36, Chapter 10, Sec. 171...
During rendition of the national anthem, when the flag is displayed, all present (except those in uniform) are expected to stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. Or, at the very least, "Stand and Face It".
 
Senator Obama replied :
"As I've said about the flag pin, I don't want to be perceived as taking sides." "There are a lot of people in the world to whom the American flag is a symbol of oppression..." "The anthem itself conveys a war-like message. You know, the bombs bursting in air and all that sort of thing."
Obama continued: "The National Anthem should be 'swapped' for something less parochial and less bellicose. I like the song 'I'd Like To Teach the World To Sing'. If that were our anthem, then, I might salute it. In my opinion, we should consider reinventing our National Anthem as well as 'redesign' our Flag to better offer our enemies hope and love.  It’s my intention, if elected, to disarm America to the level of acceptance to our Middle East Brethren. If we, as a Nation of warring people, conduct ourselves like the nations of Islam, where peace prevails, perhaps a state or period of mutual accord could exist between our governments."
When I Become President, I will seek a pact of agreement to end hostilities between those who have been at war or in a state of enmity, and a freedom from disquieting oppressive thoughts. We as a Nation, have placed upon the nations of Islam, an unfair injustice which is WHY my wife disrespects the Flag and she and I have attended several flag burning ceremonies in the past".

"Of course now,
I have found myself about to become
The President of the United States and I have put my hatred aside.
 I will use my power to bring CHANGE to this Nation, and offer the people a new path. My wife and I look forward to becoming our Country's First black Family. Indeed, CHANGE is about to overwhelm the United States of America."
Yes, you read it right.
Please pass on without comment.
Just think, with the entire country knowing how
that man thought and believed,
 they still elected him
to run and represent the country two times.

 

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

A Word (of advice) From Henry Kissinger


By Walter Russell Mead

Feb. 5, 2018

When The Wall Street Journal asked me to become its Global View columnist, I immediately went for advice to the dominant figure in American foreign policy of the past 50 years: Henry Kissinger.

Asking Mr. Kissinger a question is a little like inquiring at the Oracle of Delphi: You never quite know what you are going to get. Some queries elicit long, learned analyses. Mr. Kissinger often deftly weaves together the motives of the leaders involved, the interests of the U.S., and the effect of American domestic politics on the range of available choices.

Some questions elicit a more lapidary response. In the aftermath of the Cold War, I once heard someone ask Mr. Kissinger what he saw as the most important trends in the world. I braced myself for an hour of sage but complex geopolitical monologue. Instead he replied with a single sentence, albeit one with more substance than most books published in the field: “You must never forget that the unification of Germany is more important than the development of the European Union, that the fall of the Soviet Union is more important than the unification of Germany, and that the rise of India and China is more important than the fall of the Soviet Union.”

My request for advice as a new columnist did not even merit a sentence; Mr. Kissinger had only a word for me. What a column on international affairs should seek to provide, he said, is “context.”

That short answer points to the heart of Mr. Kissinger’s worldview—and to the vast intellectual gap between him and most of the academics who study foreign affairs and the bureaucrats who carry it out. It has often been said, sometimes by Mr. Kissinger himself, that he is a “realist” while many of his critics are “idealists.” There is some truth there, and Mr. Kissinger’s most trenchant opponents attack what they characterize as his cynical willingness to achieve policy objectives through morally dubious or even reprehensible means. But the gap between Mr. Kissinger and the rest cuts deeper. He isn’t suspicious merely of rosy idealism; he is suspicious of those who think ideologically about foreign policy, reasoning down from first principles and lofty assumptions rather than grounding their analysis in the messiness and contradictions of the real world.

Unlike so many professors, policy makers and pundits on both the left and right, Mr. Kissinger does not believe the arc of history makes house calls. American values may one day prevail around the world, but no leader should base strategic calculations on a hope that Russia, China and Iran will turn into friendly liberal democracies in a relevant time frame. Nor would a wise policy maker assume that other powers share America’s interest in, for example, an end to the North Korean nuclear program—or any initiative aimed at making the international order more stable and secure. 

Oddly, the “conservative” Mr. Kissinger takes diversity much more seriously than many of his liberal critics. Historical study and a lifetime of experience have taught Mr. Kissinger the folly of assuming that Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping or Ayatollah Khamenei thinks like American leaders do or wants the same things. Each of these men and their supporters are grounded in cultural and historical imperatives that do not always mesh with ideas about Adam Smith, liberal order and win-win negotiating.

When Mr. Kissinger advises a columnist to focus on “context,” he is suggesting that there is value in helping readers to appreciate the kaleidoscopic variety and sometimes dizzying complexity of the forces at work on the international scene, and in explaining how those forces interact with American politics.

In 2018, this mission is more important than ever. After the Soviet Union’s collapse, the United States and its Cold War allies sought to spread Western institutions around the world, but that effort has ground to a halt. Support for free trade, free movement of capital, free speech and free government is in retreat in many places, the U.S. not excepted. Geopolitical rivals are trying to roll back American power, and longtime allies like Turkey are moving away from the West. The end of history has ended, and the world is suddenly looking more Kissingerian. 

It has never been more important to understand world events, and it has rarely been harder to do so. I look forward to the challenge of engaging with the Journal’s readers on the momentous geopolitical trends of our time, and I hope that this column can help, if only in a small way, prepare our country for the tests that lie ahead. 

Appeared in the February 6, 2018, print edition - WSJ

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Bogus Racist Claims Against Trump





As President Trump lays out and implements his vision for American success — via his campaign slogan, "Make America Great Again" — there remain defiant naysayers.  Among the most defiant are those who want to talk about race.  They oppose Trump, claiming he is biased against minorities.

Unfortunately, talking about race is a great diversion from the discussion about the ideas and policies we need as a nation to move forward.  The proposition that America is a country defined by a set of founding principles that are true for all is itself taken as racism. It flies in the face of the identity politics, so loved by the left, that sees American greatness not in universal principles but in giving credence to the claims of interest groups and responding to these claims through new laws and court decisions.


African-Americans are, of course, the poster children of interest groups, because of the history of injustices to which blacks can point.  But we seem to forget that in order for there to be sense of injustice and wrong, we need principles defining what is just and right.

If we look back to Barack Obama's famous speech at the 2004 Democratic Convention — the speech that put him on the political map — he sounds like Donald Trump.  "Now even as we speak," he said, "there are those preparing to divide us, the spin masters, and negative ad peddlers, who embrace the politics of anything goes.  "Well I say to them tonight, there is not a liberal America or a conservative America; there's the United States of America.  "There's not a black America and a white America and Latino America and Asian America; there's the United States of America.  "We are one people, all of us pledging allegiance to the Stars and Stripes, all of us defending the United States of America."

When Trump makes these same points, because he is de facto delegitimizing interest group politics, many blacks — and, of course, most liberals — call him racist.  Granted, our president is not always careful with his rhetoric. But policy and principles are what we should be looking at, not rhetoric.

We might recall that four years after Obama stated those inspiring words, he was quoted during the 2008 campaign, speaking about working-class Americans hard hit by the recession, saying, "They get bitter, they cling to guns or religion, or antipathy to people who aren't like them, or anti-immigrant sentiment, or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations."

The point is that the difference between Obama and Trump is not prejudice toward white working-class Americans versus prejudice toward minorities.  The difference is in their ideas of what makes America great. One sees big, activist government as what defines us. The other sees limited government and individual freedom as what defines us.  Trump is bringing back individual freedom and economic freedom. And it's working. Deregulation and a new tax-cutting law are freeing up the marketplace, and the economy is seriously picking up steam.

The latest Wells Fargo/Gallup Small Business Index, which measures "small-business owners' attitudes about a wide-variety of factors affecting their businesses," shows the highest score in 11 years.  Fifty-two percent of "business owners reported their revenue increased a little or a lot over the past 12 months ... the highest reading on this measure since 2007."

Is this good for blacks? A growing, churning economy is good for every American.  Economic growth is the engine of opportunity.

Let's not get diverted by racial rhetoric. Individual freedom, not interest group politics, is the platform through which every American, of every background, can realize their potential and participate in a growing, job-creating economy.

Star Parker is an author and president of CURE, Center for Urban Renewal and Education.  Contact her at www.urbancure.org.

To find out more about Star Parker and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.


Sunday, January 28, 2018

The Meaning Of The Flag Draped Coffin

What a wonderful lesson this was for me. I do not recall ever being taught this in school. "The Meaning of the Flag-Draped Coffin"

All Americans should be given this lesson. Those who think that America is an arrogant nation should really reconsider that thought. Our founding fathers used GOD's word and teachings to establish our Great Nation and I think it's high time Americans get re-educated about this Nation's history.

Please pass it along and be proud of the country we live in, and even more proud of those who serve to protect our 'GOD-GIVEN' rights and freedoms. I hope you take the time to read this ... To understand what the flag draped coffin really means ...

Here is how to understand the flag that laid upon it and is surrendered to so many widows and widowers: Do you know that at military funerals, the 21-gun salute stands for the sum of the numbers in the year 1776?

Have you ever noticed that the honor guard pays meticulous attention to correctly folding the United States of America Flag 13 times? You probably thought it was to symbolize the original 13 colonies, but we learn something new every day! The 1st fold of the flag is a symbol of life. The 2nd fold is a symbol of the belief in eternal life.

The 3rd fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing the ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of the country to attain peace throughout the world.

The 4th fold represents the weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance.

The 5th fold is a tribute to the country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, 'Our Country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.'

The 6th fold is for where people's hearts lie. It is with their heart that they pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America , and the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

The 7th fold is a tribute to its Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces tat they protect their country and their flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of their republic..

The 8th fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day.

The 9th fold is a tribute to womanhood, and Mothers. For it has been through their aith, their love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great has been molded.

The 10th fold is a tribute to the father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of their country since they were first born.

The 11th fold represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies in the Hebrews eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

The 12th fold represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in the Christians eyes, God the Father, the Son and Holy Spirit.

The 13th fold, or when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost reminding them of their Nations motto, 'In God We Trust.'

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, ever reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington, and the Sailors and Marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones, who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for them the rights, privileges and freedoms they enjoy today.

There are some traditions and ways of doing things that have deep meaning. In the future, you'll see flags folded and now you will know why.

Please share this with the children you love and all others who love what is referred to as the symbol of ' Liberty and Freedom.'

MAYBE THE SUPREME COURT SHOULD READ THIS EXPLANATION BEFORE THEY RENDER THEIR DECISION ON THE PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE.

FORWARD IT; MAYBE SOMEONE WITH THE NECESSARY POWER, OR POLITICAL AND FINANCIAL INFLUENCE, WILL GET IT TO THEM.



IN THE MEANTIME, MAY G O D PROTECT US ALWAYS.  ONE NATION, UNDER GOD, WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.